Hosting a WordPress site on AppFog, without persistent file storage

Earlier I wrote a very positive post about my experience of migrating from a shared web host to AppFog’s cloud platform. However, there are some quirks and caveats with my WordPress site for which I’ve had to find workarounds. Chief among them is that AppFog currently does not offer a persistent file system. As with most PaaS providers right now, all persistent data is expected to go in a database. [Read More]

Moving from shared hosting to a PaaS

Background A couple of years ago I migrated all of my hosting providers, and wrote a series of posts (one, two, three, four) about the state of the market at the time. The market that I’m in consists of: Hosting a static WordPress blog on the cheap Having the opportunity to tinker with some light development using Ruby, Python, or Node.js (since I already use Java and Scala all day professionally) The pipe-dream that one of my ideas might catch fire, and need to scale up dramatically overnight! [Read More]

Searching for shared web hosting that doesn’t suck (3 of 3)

_(NOTE: A lot of the information here has been updated for 2013 in this more recent post)_ Shared web hosting vs. VPS or cloud providers After migrating in a hurry from a terrible shared hosting provider (part 1) to a slightly-less-terrible host (part 2), I wanted to take my time in finding a more long-term home with the option of hosting some light development. The most obvious idea these days is to simply get a complete virtual machine from a VPS provider such as Linode, or maybe use a “cloud” (ugh) service such as Google App Engine. [Read More]

Searching for shared web hosting that doesn’t suck (2 of 3)

_(NOTE: A lot of the information here has been updated for 2013 in this more recent post)_ Using Google to take mail out of the shared web host picture When I decided to migrate from a previous shared host (previous post), I was most upset about the hassle of moving my mail. That is always the least fun part of the process, involving: downloading all my remote IMAP mail to local folders creating matching accounts on the new host changing the nameservers and spending a couple of days in messy flux, with some mail being delivered to the new host and other mail routed my old host re-uploading local mail back to the IMAP folders Having heard positive feedback from some friends, I decided to switch my mail hosting to Google so I would never have to deal with this hassle again. [Read More]

Searching for shared web hosting that doesn’t suck (1 of 3)

_(NOTE: A lot of the information here has been updated for 2013 in this more recent post)_ Lessons learned: 1 be security-conscious, and [2] don’t use 2MHost It hasn’t been a very good year for this domain name. For years now, my email and website have been hosted by 2MHost, a bargain-basement shared host charging only 30-something bucks a year. This suited my needs just fine. I briefly maintained a general-interest WordPress blog, but took it down after Facebook filled that need. [Read More]